Thursday, July 15, 2010

I$$

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STS-125 Mission Specialist Ron Garan just twittered from his @Astro_Ron account this ISS gem in the Science & Space section of USAToday:

International Space Station Piece by piece
Piece by piece...

The feature is almost two years old, so I cannot believe I've never found it before – or that no one ever emailed me the link. (You find out pretty quickly as a blogger that friends, family, readers and complete strangers are rabidly delighted to send you anything and everything related to your chosen blog theme!)

ISS
At the time, the animated graphics (compliments of NASA) showed the International Space Station: 10 Years in the Making on the decade anniversary of the onset of construction, 200+ miles above the Earth's surface. Since then, of course, we and other participating nations have completed the "To Do" list to the right of the graphics.

It's truly amazing when you see the entire structure come together:

Intl Space Station Components
Wow.

Clicking on any of these causes the pertinent component of the ISS graphic to light up in red, whereby a text box appears with details. It's a great interactive tool to learn about, or teach your kids, all the different pieces in order of assembly!

5 comments:

JLeonid said...

Amen. This is a delightful and user-friendly animated graphic for non-scientist/engineer types like me. It's definitely worth the look.

Mrs. L said...

Cool!

Suzanne said...

That's very cool.

Another fascinating thing that most people don't realize is that you can WATCH the International Space Station fly overhead. Here's the link. Choose your country and then your area.

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/cities/skywatch.cgi?country=United+States

I watch every evening that it's passing overhead my town, if the weather permits. It never gets old for me. Everytime I see it streaking overhead I am reminded that there are real people working up there. It's very exciting.

It's very easy to spot. It's quite bright, moving fast and steady. The chart will tell you where to look for it in the sky, how high above the horizon it will appear and it's direction.

Amnon I. Govrin said...

Note to self: I need to be more rabid :-)

I saw this a while ago (not when it came out either).

PillowNaut said...

@Amnon, please be rabid, LOL... but I wouldn't blame you if you kept stuff for your own blog. Interestingly, the amount of folks sending me links has gone down since about April -- after awhile, I think everyone assumes that someone else sent me the link, hehe... but as ever, it just depends on how much browse-time we have after work ;)